#INTLYALITMONTH: The Gilded Ones by Namina Forna

Review by Sarah Ducharme The Gilded Ones by Namina Forna Deka is terrified. She is turning 16 and the Ritual of Purity is looming. She's worried that her community will discover what she has suspected about herself for years: she's different. She might even be "Impure," the label given to any girl whose blood runs … Continue reading #INTLYALITMONTH: The Gilded Ones by Namina Forna

#INTLYALITMONTH: Burmese Moons by Sophie Ansel & Sam Garcia

Review by Jonathan Hill Burmese Moons by Sophie Ansel and Sam Garcia America and the media we consume is incredibly sterilized, especially to the plight of the people who aren’t white. We’re led to believe that despite harrowing circumstances, through determination and strength of spirit, we’ll be delivered the happy ending. Everything will work out … Continue reading #INTLYALITMONTH: Burmese Moons by Sophie Ansel & Sam Garcia

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Hunt is On (Seekers of the Aweto Book 1)

As an early literacy advocate, I am a huge proponent of graphic novels and comic books. Graphic novels can help hook reluctant readers, build visual literacy, and challenge students to read analytically. Do not let the presence of pictures fool you; as in picture books, there is often more to them that meets the eye. … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Hunt is On (Seekers of the Aweto Book 1)

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Where We Go From Here

As someone who grew up during the 80s and 90s, I have several memories of the earlier years of the AIDS epidemic. I still remember the news reports of gay men dying in large numbers, and learning about how HIV is spread—and how it is not. I also remember the death of Freddie Mercury (right … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Where We Go From Here

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Other Side

Much of the rhetoric around immigration from Central America across the southern United States border discusses persons wanting to enter the U.S. in abstract and dehumanizing terms: as caravans, illegal aliens, vectors of disease, even as an invasion. We spend so much time talking about Central American refugees and what they represent, yet we rarely … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Other Side

#DutchKidLit Young Adult Biography – Vincent by Barbara Stok

The beauty of the close, mutually supportive relationship between brothers Vincent and Theo van Gogh at the end of Vincent's turbulent life is the heart and soul of this graphic biography, written by cartoonist Barbara Stok for the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. Stok "based scenes and storylines in Vincent on Van Gogh’s letters to his brother … Continue reading #DutchKidLit Young Adult Biography – Vincent by Barbara Stok

#DutchKidLit – Fright Night by Maren Stoffels

Shortlisted for the 2021 Global Literature in Libraries Initiative Translated YA Book Prize I always thought death would look different.A bit like in the movies.Spectacular, sad, or perhaps scary.But your death was lonely,even though there were four people around you:three people watching -- and me,your murderer. - Murderer, Fright Night What if you had the … Continue reading #DutchKidLit – Fright Night by Maren Stoffels

#IntlYALitMonth: Abigail

Abigail by Magda Szabó, translated from the Hungarian by Len Dix Who doesn't love a boarding school novel? Especially one written by an author who actually experienced life within a similar one for herself? Hungarians love this book so much, they voted it their third most-beloved novel during the Hungarian Big Read of 2005. So … Continue reading #IntlYALitMonth: Abigail

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Trees for the Absentees

Being a teenager is hard enough as it is. Layer in the loss of a beloved grandparent, gossiping relatives, a father who is a political prisoner, and the trauma of centuries of military occupation, and perhaps the only way to make sense of everything is to resort to the fantastical. Trees for the Absentees is … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Trees for the Absentees

South African Womxn Writers – Day 10: Sally Partridge writes about the “rainbow of talent” in South Africa’s youth fiction

South Africa is known as the Rainbow Nation, and no-where is this colourful spirit more present than in the country's colourful array of young adult fiction written by some of the country’s most prolific female authors. Every year a throng of both recognised and new female voices hit the shelves, driven by the social issues … Continue reading South African Womxn Writers – Day 10: Sally Partridge writes about the “rainbow of talent” in South Africa’s youth fiction