Once upon a time in Bulgaria – Elias Canetti: The Tongue Set Free

The most famous and probably most important writer born in Bulgaria is Elias Canetti. The Nobel Prize Winner was born 1905 in Ruse at the Danube, at that time an important trading center and the most modern town in Bulgaria. Although Canetti was neither by ethnicity, nor by nationality, nor by language a Bulgarian author … Continue reading Once upon a time in Bulgaria – Elias Canetti: The Tongue Set Free

‘Daring to Drive: A Saudi Woman’s Awakening’ by Manal Al-Sharif

Congratulations to the citizens of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, where women have achieved the freedom to drive this week! Change happens very slowly and then all of a sudden. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sowNSH_W2r0 Manal Al-Sharif driving on the streets of Saudi Arabia Manal Al-Sharif was the very public face of the #Women2Drive campaign in the Kingdom of … Continue reading ‘Daring to Drive: A Saudi Woman’s Awakening’ by Manal Al-Sharif

A Month of Turkish Literature via Global Literature in Libraries Initiative

https://www.ted.com/talks/ann_morgan_my_year_reading_a_book_from_every_country_in_the_world By Karen Van Drie, Editor of Turkish Literature Month for Global Literature in Libraries Like a lot of people who love to read, I was captivated by Ann Morgan's reading innovation of reading a book from every country in the world. What a cool idea! Short of visiting every nation in the world, how … Continue reading A Month of Turkish Literature via Global Literature in Libraries Initiative

‘Gavur Mahallesi’ by Migirdic Margosyan

by Matthew Chovanec While working on edits for the translation of 'Gavur Mahallesi' by  Mıgırdiç Margosyan, I received feedback for each of the four different languages used in the book of short stories. Over lunch, an Armenian staff writer at a New York magazine told me that it would be better to translate ‘Agavni’ as … Continue reading ‘Gavur Mahallesi’ by Migirdic Margosyan

‘My Grandmother’ by Fethiye Çetin

By Dr. Rubina Peroomian   I want to start this blog with the question posed to me after I delivered the keynote speech at the AIEA (Association internationale des études armeniénnes) Conference, last week, held in Oxford UK (my topic was “The Diasporan Armenian Literature Entering the Second Century of the Continuing Effects of the Genocide”). … Continue reading ‘My Grandmother’ by Fethiye Çetin

‘Never Regret The Pain: Loving and Losing a Bipolar Spouse’ by Sel Erder Yackley

Sel Erder Yackley is a native Türk -- an immigrant and now a citizen of America. I had the chance to hear her sharing memories of living with a bipolar spouse. Her black and white book cover looked awfully grim, the title even grimmer, and the subject did nothing to make me say, "gee, I … Continue reading ‘Never Regret The Pain: Loving and Losing a Bipolar Spouse’ by Sel Erder Yackley

A Documentary Novel: “The Entrusted Trousseau – Peoples of the Exchange” by Kemal Yalçin

One of the advantages of reading in my adopted language of Turkish is, of course, the range of books available in Turkey by Turkish authors. Books published in Turkey are much cheaper than foreign-language imported books, so this book seemed like a bargain when a bookseller recommended it to me. It changed the way I … Continue reading A Documentary Novel: “The Entrusted Trousseau – Peoples of the Exchange” by Kemal Yalçin

Halide Edib: The Indian Connection

  Halide Edib's "Inside India" was first published in 1937 by George Allen & Unwin Ltd, but remained unnoticed for many years. Then in 2002, Oxford University Press reprinted it with an introduction by the eminent historian of India, Prof. Mushirul Hasan, who also served as vice-chancellor of Jamia Millia Islamia (translation: Community Islamic University), in … Continue reading Halide Edib: The Indian Connection

Graphic Novels from Turkey

Foreign teachers of English in Turkey quickly learn that many Turkish parents want their children to grow up to be either a doctor or an engineer. Those were the safest choices in earlier generations, and parents are occasionally reluctant to believe in the new expanded choices available in a booming Turkey.  Children are expected to … Continue reading Graphic Novels from Turkey

An Enduring Resonance: Turkey’s Jewish Voices

By Dayla Rogers The Ottoman Empire (1299-1923) was a mind-bogglingly diverse place. For nearly seven centuries all stripes of Muslim, Christian and Jewish people, falling into countless ethnic and linguistic groups, existed in relative harmony compared to Europe, where ghettos, pogroms and discrimination were commonplace. Sephardic Jews, defined as those of Spain and Portugal, were … Continue reading An Enduring Resonance: Turkey’s Jewish Voices