#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Temple Alley Summer

Written by award-winning Japanese author Sachiko Kashiwaba, Temple Alley Summer* features not one but two ghost stories. The first is the outer shell in this engrossing middle-grade novel and a fully-fleshed narrative; the other is an embedded fairy-tale fantasy with intriguing connections and parallels to the first. In the “outer” ghost story, Kazu, who is … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Temple Alley Summer

#WorldKidLit Weekend: The Story of the Blue Planet

A Roald Dahlian eco-parable for middle grade readers, The Story of the Blue Planet* takes place on a special, beautiful planet strikingly similar to earth and inhabited only by children. These Peter-Pan-esque protagonists never age and come in all shapes and sizes. Some are “even weird like the child you see in the mirror.” They can … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Weekend: The Story of the Blue Planet

#IntlYALitMonth: The Girl and the Ghost

A novel for tweens and young teens, The Girl and the Ghost is based on a Malaysian folk tale. It’s much more than a simple retelling, as author Hanna Alkaf has fleshed out the story with richly drawn characters, creating a marvelous tale about friendship, family, jealousy, and love. As the story goes, there was … Continue reading #IntlYALitMonth: The Girl and the Ghost

#BlackIsBeautiful: Genesis Begins Again

Our Blackness is beautiful and diverse, our skin representing a variety of shades and hues, from light to dark and dark to light, a blending of ethnicities and cultures.  And yet there are conflicting ideals of beauty, as society pressures communities of color to conform to their expectations.  It’s taken us awhile to get to … Continue reading #BlackIsBeautiful: Genesis Begins Again

Interview with Rachel Yung-Hsin Wang

This post is published simultaneously on Chinese Books for Young Readers Kirkus reviewer Rachel Yung-Hsin Wang has lived and worked in many parts of the world, and is something of a polyglot. Earlier this year she completed an MFA in Writing for Children at Simmons University, having won a Lee & Low and Simmons Friends … Continue reading Interview with Rachel Yung-Hsin Wang

#WorldKidLitWednesday: The Casket of Time

What if you could stop time? Would it work? Would it even be a good idea? That is the core dilemma in The Casket of Time, an intricately plotted, carefully wrought, and beautifully translated book for YA readers by Icelandic author, poet and former presidential candidate Andri Snær Magnason. Made up of two interwoven stories … Continue reading #WorldKidLitWednesday: The Casket of Time

#WorldKidLitWednesday: Kiki’s Delivery Service

Make way for Kiki! A beloved children’s classic in Japan ever since it was originally published in 1985, Kiki’s Delivery Service by Eiko Kadono has been out of print in English translation for over a decade, despite its continuing fame via Hayao Miyazaki’s animated adaptation. And adaptation it is: there are significant differences between the book and the movie. … Continue reading #WorldKidLitWednesday: Kiki’s Delivery Service

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Meet Reviewer Marcia Lynx Qualey

Marcia Lynx Qualey is a Rabat, Morocco-based translator from Arabic and an all-around champion of #worldkidlit—in fact, she coined the term! Previously based in Cairo, Marcia co-founded #WorldKidLit Month (September) with Alexandra Büchler and Lawrence Schimel in 2016, creating a platform to discuss translations into English for children—especially translations from underrepresented languages and cultures. The … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Meet Reviewer Marcia Lynx Qualey

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Raven’s Children

“They had fed him these sinister thoughts dressed up with noble phrases . . . It was only once they’d settled deep inside you that they grew and grew, and started to suck away at your soul.” These lines from the novel The Raven’s Children by Yulia Yakovleva, translated from the Russian by Ruth Ahmedzai … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Raven’s Children

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: I Lived on Butterfly Hill

“So—are you saying that our souls can be knocked down like houses?”   “Yes, my wise girl,” she says. “Our souls can crumble when we don’t care about our neighbors, or when we say hateful things about others, or exclude people for being different.” This exchange between eleven-year-old Chilean Celeste Marconi and her mother, in … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: I Lived on Butterfly Hill