Middle Grade Books from Singapore

Today’s post about Singaporean literature comes from Mairin Raisdana at UWCSEA East and Kim Beeman at Tanglin Trust. We have picked out a range of our favorite books for middle grades written in and about Singapore, suitable for children ages from 10 to 14. You can find Barb’s previous post about picture books from Singapore … Continue reading Middle Grade Books from Singapore

#WorldKidLitWednesday: The Night of Wishes, or The Satanarchaeolidealcohellish Notion Potion

Shadow Sorcery Minister Beelzebub Preposter is in quite a pickle. His Aunt Tyrannia Vampirella is in the same pickle jar with him. It’s New Year’s Eve and Preposter's gotten behind on his evilness payments. Despite his best efforts, he has only managed to perform half his annual obligation of making ten species extinct, polluting five … Continue reading #WorldKidLitWednesday: The Night of Wishes, or The Satanarchaeolidealcohellish Notion Potion

#WorldKidLitWednesday: Arnica, the Duck Princess

Make way for a wonderful fairy tale for readers ages 6-10! Written by beloved Hungarian children’s author Ervin Lázár, Arnica, the Duck Princess features sumptuously colored, folk art illustrations by Jacqueline Molnár that make it both a satisfying read-aloud and read-alone book, bridging the gap between picture book and middle grade chapter book.  Anna Bentley’s … Continue reading #WorldKidLitWednesday: Arnica, the Duck Princess

#WorldKidLitWednesday: Yours Sincerely, Giraffe

Did you have a pen pal when you were little? Maybe someone from halfway around the world, whom you’d never seen, from a land you knew nothing about? That’s the premise of Yours Sincerely, Giraffe, a sweet, zany chapter book for ages 6-10, with charming illustrations by award-winning artist Jun Takabatake (Bologna Children’s Book Fair Graphics … Continue reading #WorldKidLitWednesday: Yours Sincerely, Giraffe

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Wild Book

I love a sweet first-love story. Here’s one set in Mexico in summer that is bound to charm a middle grader near you. The Wild Book by Juan Villoro, translated by Lawrence Schimel, features a thirteen-year-old boy named Juan whose summer begins in the worst possible way: with news of his parents’ divorce. He learns … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Wild Book

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Meet Translator Avery Fischer Udagawa

Meet my wonderful co-#WorldKidLitWednesday blogger, Avery Fischer Udagawa! Avery grew up in Kansas and has lived in Bangkok, Thailand, for over a dozen years.  But does she translate from Thai into English? No! That would be far too straightforward a situation for this busy, accomplished translator.   Avery is a multiply published translator of Japanese … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Meet Translator Avery Fischer Udagawa

Excerpt: Lampie and the Children of the Sea by Annet Schaap

Part 1 The Lighthouse Match An island barely attached to the mainland, like a loose tooth on a thread, is called a peninsula. On this small peninsula, there is a lighthouse, a tall grey one that swings its light at night over the small town by the sea. It stops ships from smashing into the … Continue reading Excerpt: Lampie and the Children of the Sea by Annet Schaap

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Mister Orange

Who is Mister Orange? And why is this quiet, moving book named after him? Written by award-winning Dutch author and editor, Truus Matti, and beautifully translated by another award-winner, Laura Watkinson, Mister Orange won the Netherlands' 2012 Silver Slate Pencil Award and the American Library Associations's 2014 Mildred L. Batchelder Award. The story begins in … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Mister Orange

Maria Parr

Today I would like to introduce you to the works of Norwegian author Maria Parr. Born in 1981, she writes children's books and works as a teacher. She has won several awards for her books. The hilarious story about Trille and Lena growing up in Mathildewick was first translated by Guy Puzey and published as … Continue reading Maria Parr

A Warwick Prize Shortlist and Clementine Loves Red

When a translated book for children makes the shortlist of an award also open to grown-up books, my heart leaps. Because yes, children’s literature is literature. And translators of children’s books need plenty of credit and support for their careers, made tenuous by the (currently—we can change this) low demand for #worldkidlit translated into English. … Continue reading A Warwick Prize Shortlist and Clementine Loves Red