#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Emil and Karl

Written in 1940 on the eve of World War II, Emil and Karl is a gripping read. Set in 1938 Vienna, it tells the story of best friends Emil and Karl, both of whom have lost fathers. They quickly lose their mothers as well. Emil is Jewish; Karl is not.  One is treated cruelly due … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Emil and Karl

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Hunt is On (Seekers of the Aweto Book 1)

As an early literacy advocate, I am a huge proponent of graphic novels and comic books. Graphic novels can help hook reluctant readers, build visual literacy, and challenge students to read analytically. Do not let the presence of pictures fool you; as in picture books, there is often more to them that meets the eye. … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Hunt is On (Seekers of the Aweto Book 1)

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Mister Fairy

Think every fairy looks like Tinkerbell, with a cute tutu, and a twinkle in her lovely eye as she daintily darts around waving her magic wand like a ray of magical sunshine? Think again. "Everyone knows the forest is full of all kinds of fairies… There are morning fairies, brave fairies, sleepy-time fairies, and even … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Mister Fairy

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Easy Life in Kamusari

Imagine leaving high school in a bustling metropolis and being sent deep into the mountains as a trainee forester. And—horror of horrors—having your mobile phone disabled on the day you arrive. This is what happens to Yuki Hirano, an eighteen-year-old Japanese boy, who freely admits that study is not his thing. Well, life in the … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Easy Life in Kamusari

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: That’s Not Normal!

One of my repeated assertions is that picture books are much more than what they seem. They are more than just cute pictures and easy words to read to children before bedtime; they are in fact powerful works of art that can reveal deep truths to people of all ages. Picture books are for everyone. … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: That’s Not Normal!

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Colorful

As my dead soul leisurely drifted off to some dark place, this angel I’d never seen before suddenly appeared right in my way. "Congratulations! You’ve won the lottery!" The angel smiled. So begins Colorful, a surprisingly humorous YA novel about mental illness, bullying, and teen suicide. The protagonist—nameless throughout most of the book—isn’t thrilled to … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Colorful

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Wonder of the World Leaf

In today’s #WorldKidLit Wednesday review, let's travel to the Caribbean island of Trinidad, where Wygenia uses bush medicine to help heal her Grannie. The Wonder of the World Leaf is aimed at readers ages 6-8, who are reading confidently and fluently most of the time. My edition is a slim 32-page paperback with short paragraphs … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Wonder of the World Leaf

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Here the Whole Time

Last month I reviewed the first of our co-winners for the GLLI Translated YA Book Prize. This month we turn to the second winner of the prize, Here the Whole Time. Written by Vitor Martins, this book gives us another look into the lives of LGBTQ young people in Brazil. Also translated by Larissa Helena, … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Here the Whole Time

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Sato the Rabbit

A surreal symphony of vibrant colors and images, Sato the Rabbit* is a whimsical trilogy of picture books for readers age 4-8: One day, Haneru Sato became a rabbit. He's been a rabbit ever since. He likes stars, the ocean, and tasty treats. He likes lots of other things, too. What young child hasn’t imagined … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Sato the Rabbit

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Where We Go From Here

As someone who grew up during the 80s and 90s, I have several memories of the earlier years of the AIDS epidemic. I still remember the news reports of gay men dying in large numbers, and learning about how HIV is spread—and how it is not. I also remember the death of Freddie Mercury (right … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Where We Go From Here