Three poets, three poems from Nepal: Dr. Rupak Shrestha, Bhisma Upreti and Dr. Tanka Upreti

Today, I present three poems by three poets from Nepal. 'To Orchid' by Dr. Rupak Shrestha Rupak Shrestha, a renowned figure in the Nepalese Diaspora in the United Kingdom is originally from Pokhara, Nepal. He lives in London. His solo recitations have been popular. He is sound in various forms of poetry such as Free … Continue reading Three poets, three poems from Nepal: Dr. Rupak Shrestha, Bhisma Upreti and Dr. Tanka Upreti

Three poets, three poems from Nepal: Nirmal K Thapa, L B Chettri and Prollas Sindhulia

Today, I present three poems by three poets from Nepal. 'Shaky Pears' by Nirmal Kumar Thapa Nirmal Kumar Thapa from Nepal is a unique poet and famous for his spiritual blend and contemporary life to present in his poetic graph. His dozens of previous book work welcomed gracefully. Nirmal's recent work is Crystal Vs Nirmal. … Continue reading Three poets, three poems from Nepal: Nirmal K Thapa, L B Chettri and Prollas Sindhulia

A POETIC VISIT TO A COUNTRY CHURCHYARD

Today's post is a book review by Hem Biswakarma on Gopi Sapkota's poetry collection 'A Suicide Note'. A Suicide Note by Gopi Sapkota, Publisher: lulu.com, ISBN-10: 1445758296, ISBN-13: 978-1445758299 A POETIC VISIT TO A COUNTRY CHURCHYARD - Hem Bishwakarma I feel like a sapling when it comes to talking about poetry. I am growing and learning about … Continue reading A POETIC VISIT TO A COUNTRY CHURCHYARD

A Nepali poetry collection: Bhisma Upreti’s ‘What if the Sky Falls?’

Today, I present a book review by literary editor L B Chhetri on poet Bhisma Upreti's book 'What if the Sky Falls?' A love of life in What if the Sky Falls? - L B Chhetri Bhisma Upreti, a well-known poet and essayist of Nepal who has several books to his credit, has come out this … Continue reading A Nepali poetry collection: Bhisma Upreti’s ‘What if the Sky Falls?’

Three poets, three poems from Nepal: Tulasi Diwasa, Usha Sherchan and Govinda Giri Prerna

Today, I present three poems by three poets from Nepal. 'Sun and Cobweb' by Tulasi Diwasa Tulasi Diwasa is a prominent name in modern Nepali poetry. He has authored a dozen books on literature, folk culture and folklore of various tribes in Nepal. He served as professor of Nepali Literature at Tribhuwan University for several years. … Continue reading Three poets, three poems from Nepal: Tulasi Diwasa, Usha Sherchan and Govinda Giri Prerna

World Languages Review: Op de rand van het zwijgen (The Netherlands)

On the verge of silence  Although we live in a society full of means of communication that are hardly ever shut off – modern mankind finds itself still having difficulties and misunderstandings in simple person-to-person conversations. We talk in images that are clear to us, but frequently incomprehensible to those we are talking to. When … Continue reading World Languages Review: Op de rand van het zwijgen (The Netherlands)

World Languages Review: Jaçanã – poética sobre as águas (Brazil)

A postcard from the Amazon When we talk about Brazilian literature, more often than not, we find ourselves talking about works by authors from the São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro regions or, less often still, those related to the states of Minas Gerais and Bahia. There are, of course, exceptions proving that other Brazilian … Continue reading World Languages Review: Jaçanã – poética sobre as águas (Brazil)

The Compassionate Imagination – Sally Ito on Translating Misuzu Kaneko

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 14 Editor's note:  When I approached Canadian poet/translator Sally Ito about acting as translator for Are You an Echo? The Lost Poetry of Misuzu Kaneko, she and her aunt Michiko Tsuboi, her co-translator, had already translated at least a dozen of Misuzu's poems on their own.  The … Continue reading The Compassionate Imagination – Sally Ito on Translating Misuzu Kaneko

Translation as Treason — Michael Dylan Welch on Translating Haiku

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 11 Photo credit:  Greenhouse Fabrics In The Book of Tea, Kakuzo Okakura wrote that “Translation is always a treason, and as a Ming author observes, can at its best be only the reverse side of a brocade.” And so it seems to be—the art of translation is … Continue reading Translation as Treason — Michael Dylan Welch on Translating Haiku

THE MIRROR OF HIS WORKS — Roger Pulvers on Ishikawa Takuboku

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 1 Editor's note:  Today begins a month-long series of posts about Japanese literature in translation.  Here in the United States it is Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month, and in Japan (through this weekend, anyway), it is Golden Week, the longest vacation period of the year for many Japanese workers. … Continue reading THE MIRROR OF HIS WORKS — Roger Pulvers on Ishikawa Takuboku