#WorldKidLit Wednesday: I Am the Subway

In every city around the world, there are millions of stories—in its cars, its homes, schools, and business, and its public transport. Such is the conceit of I Am the Subway, written by Kim Hyo-eun and translated by Deborah Smith. Originally published in Korea, the protagonist of this lyrical picture book is the Seoul subway, … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: I Am the Subway

Day 23: 🇲🇺 Silence of the Chagos

In a Nutshell: What a gem of a book this is. It tells the story of Charlesia and Désiré, both from the island of Diego García. It is also about the plight of the Chagossian people, expelled from their archipelago to enable the United States to build one of their main military bases. The book … Continue reading Day 23: 🇲🇺 Silence of the Chagos

Day 16: 🇦🇫  Washing the Dust from Our Hearts: Poetry and Prose from Writers of the Afghan Women’s Writing Project

An Observation: It seems a necessary entry in my book project given the situation in Afghanistan right now. Find out more about AWWP here: https://awwproject.org/ In a Nutshell: Washing the Dust from Our Hearts: Poetry and Prose is a bilingual anthology, it was first written in English then translated as a whole into Dari (Afghan … Continue reading Day 16: 🇦🇫  Washing the Dust from Our Hearts: Poetry and Prose from Writers of the Afghan Women’s Writing Project

Day 14: 🇯🇵Moshi Moshi

Moshi Moshi means hello in Japanese, can be used on the phone and in other contexts. Observations: In November 2017, we went on our honeymoon to Japan. Prior to flying there, I ordered a few books by a smattering of Japanese authors. Kitchen was one of them. Kitchen is probably Yoshimoto’s most famous work, however … Continue reading Day 14: 🇯🇵Moshi Moshi

Day 13 🇲🇲: The Native Tourist: a Holiday Pilgrimage in Myanmar

In a Nutshell: Ma Thanegi was imprisoned for three years for her involvement in the 1988 uprisings as a personal assistant to Aung San Suu Kyi. Whilst in prison, she decided that upon release, she would take a road trip/go on a pilgrimage, by bus in Myanmar. The Native Tourist is a travelogue of sorts … Continue reading Day 13 🇲🇲: The Native Tourist: a Holiday Pilgrimage in Myanmar

The Booktrekker: Kuwait

READ My book selection for Kuwait was Motorbikes and Camels, by Nejoud Al-Yagout. This is the author’s debut novel, and I thought the format was particularly interesting. The book consists of stories about thirteen different people, all of whose lives are intertwined with the lives of one or more other people in the book. While the plot … Continue reading The Booktrekker: Kuwait

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Temple Alley Summer

Written by award-winning Japanese author Sachiko Kashiwaba, Temple Alley Summer* features not one but two ghost stories. The first is the outer shell in this engrossing middle-grade novel and a fully-fleshed narrative; the other is an embedded fairy-tale fantasy with intriguing connections and parallels to the first. In the “outer” ghost story, Kazu, who is … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Temple Alley Summer

The Booktrekker: Japan

READ One thing I’m enjoying about this reading-the-world project is that it’s nudging me to read international authors I’ve always heard about, but have never read. In the case of Japan, I finally read a book by bestselling author Haruki Murakami – Norwegian Wood, translated by Jay Rubin. As the novel opens, 37-year-old Toru Watanabe is … Continue reading The Booktrekker: Japan