#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Bronze and Sunflower

“Bronze’s family was like an old cart that has rolled for years along bumpy roads and through wind and rain. The axles need grease, the wheels need fixing, the parts seem a bit loose and the cart creaks forward, as though everything is a big effort. But it still works, and it still gets to … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Bronze and Sunflower

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Ruby Red

Ruby Red by Kerstin Gier

Like YA fantasy filled with fencing, derring-do and a dash of romance?  Historical fiction replete with counts and conspiracies? Urban paranormal novels about time traveling? Then have I got a fabulous novel-in-translation for you… While this may sound like a mashed-up, genre-bending smorgasbord of a book lost in an endless search for identity, Ruby Red is … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Ruby Red

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Three Balls of Wool (Can Change the World)

Ready to reboot a makerspace? I have a yarn about yarn to inspire you. Three Balls of Wool (Can Change the World) by Henriqueta Cristina, illustrated by Yara Kono and translated from Portuguese by Lyn Miller-Lachmann, uses knitting to show how a bit of creativity can make life better, even in rough circumstances. A family … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Three Balls of Wool (Can Change the World)

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: MAX by Sarah Cohen-Scali

Max (by Sarah Cohen-Scali, translated by Penny Hueston) is creepy.  Beautifully written. Translated in flawlessly idiomatic English. And seriously creepy. A well-researched work of historical fiction for upper YA readers*, the book tells the story of the eponymous Max, aka Konrad von Kebernsol, a product of the once-secret, actual Nazi Lebensborn program (literally, fountain of … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: MAX by Sarah Cohen-Scali

World KidLit Title Pick: Cici’s Journal (France) by Joris Chamblain and Aurelie Neyret

Cici dreams of being a novelist. Her favorite subject: people, especially adults. She’s been watching them and taking notes. Everybody has one special secret, Cici figures, and if you want to write about people, you need to understand what’s hiding inside them. But now she’s discovered something truly strange: an old man who disappears into … Continue reading World KidLit Title Pick: Cici’s Journal (France) by Joris Chamblain and Aurelie Neyret

Memories of a GLLI Intern: Must-Read Children’s & YA Books from the Middle East and North Africa (Part 3) – by Nneka Mogbo

For children’s translated literature, I attempted targeting Arabic as an original language, which significantly limited the pool of children’s writers. This was disheartening for me. In my previous post, I discussed the Royal Diaries series, a historic fiction depiction of diaries from the point of views of real-life princesses. My love for Princess Nzingha of … Continue reading Memories of a GLLI Intern: Must-Read Children’s & YA Books from the Middle East and North Africa (Part 3) – by Nneka Mogbo

Sharing the Magic: Translating Kadono Eiko, by Lynne E. Riggs

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 26 Editor's note:  Kadono Eiko is the recipient of the 2018 Hans Christian Andersen Award, the most prestigious prize given in children's literature worldwide.  She is best known outside of Japan for Majo no Takkyubin, ("Kiki's Delivery Service"), which was made into a popular animated movie by … Continue reading Sharing the Magic: Translating Kadono Eiko, by Lynne E. Riggs

Stories for Peace — Sako Ikegami on War in Japanese Children’s Literature

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 25 In any form of conflict, be it a global war or family strife, children are the most deeply impacted. Literature reflects this, and Japan, so profoundly transformed by its role in global war, is certainly no exception. Many Japanese children’s creators today experienced war first-hand as … Continue reading Stories for Peace — Sako Ikegami on War in Japanese Children’s Literature

Examining cultural messages in Japanese picture books — by Kirkus YA Editor Laura Simeon

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 22 Editor's Note:  Soon after Laura Simeon became Kirkus' YA Editor in January, she penned the following appeal for more translated literature: I clearly remember the first YA book in translation I ever read: Kazumi Yumoto’s 2002 title The Letters, translated from the Japanese by Cathy Hirano. … Continue reading Examining cultural messages in Japanese picture books — by Kirkus YA Editor Laura Simeon

Selected Japanese Picture Books — by Andrew Wong

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 18 Picture books anyone? I confess, I don’t remember reading many picture books in my childhood. I recall keeping a prized collection of The Adventures of Tintin and The Adventures of Asterix (eventually given away), but not many other kinds of stories told in pictures. Having missed out of … Continue reading Selected Japanese Picture Books — by Andrew Wong