World KidLit Title Pick: Cici’s Journal (France) by Joris Chamblain and Aurelie Neyret

Cici dreams of being a novelist. Her favorite subject: people, especially adults. She’s been watching them and taking notes. Everybody has one special secret, Cici figures, and if you want to write about people, you need to understand what’s hiding inside them. But now she’s discovered something truly strange: an old man who disappears into … Continue reading World KidLit Title Pick: Cici’s Journal (France) by Joris Chamblain and Aurelie Neyret

Memories of a GLLI Intern: Must-Read Children’s & YA Books from the Middle East and North Africa (Part 3) – by Nneka Mogbo

For children’s translated literature, I attempted targeting Arabic as an original language, which significantly limited the pool of children’s writers. This was disheartening for me. In my previous post, I discussed the Royal Diaries series, a historic fiction depiction of diaries from the point of views of real-life princesses. My love for Princess Nzingha of … Continue reading Memories of a GLLI Intern: Must-Read Children’s & YA Books from the Middle East and North Africa (Part 3) – by Nneka Mogbo

Sharing the Magic: Translating Kadono Eiko, by Lynne E. Riggs

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 26 Editor's note:  Kadono Eiko is the recipient of the 2018 Hans Christian Andersen Award, the most prestigious prize given in children's literature worldwide.  She is best known outside of Japan for Majo no Takkyubin, ("Kiki's Delivery Service"), which was made into a popular animated movie by … Continue reading Sharing the Magic: Translating Kadono Eiko, by Lynne E. Riggs

Stories for Peace — Sako Ikegami on War in Japanese Children’s Literature

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 25 In any form of conflict, be it a global war or family strife, children are the most deeply impacted. Literature reflects this, and Japan, so profoundly transformed by its role in global war, is certainly no exception. Many Japanese children’s creators today experienced war first-hand as … Continue reading Stories for Peace — Sako Ikegami on War in Japanese Children’s Literature

Examining cultural messages in Japanese picture books — by Kirkus YA Editor Laura Simeon

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 22 Editor's Note:  Soon after Laura Simeon became Kirkus' YA Editor in January, she penned the following appeal for more translated literature: I clearly remember the first YA book in translation I ever read: Kazumi Yumoto’s 2002 title The Letters, translated from the Japanese by Cathy Hirano. … Continue reading Examining cultural messages in Japanese picture books — by Kirkus YA Editor Laura Simeon

Selected Japanese Picture Books — by Andrew Wong

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 18 Picture books anyone? I confess, I don’t remember reading many picture books in my childhood. I recall keeping a prized collection of The Adventures of Tintin and The Adventures of Asterix (eventually given away), but not many other kinds of stories told in pictures. Having missed out of … Continue reading Selected Japanese Picture Books — by Andrew Wong

Choctaw Culture Graces Every Page of Picture Book About an Artist in the Making

      When you know that every day some 86,000 people go online to study the Choctaw language, it makes it a little easier to understand why one of the best things about Sherri Maret’s new picture book The Cloud Artist may be that it can be read in both English and Choctaw. In … Continue reading Choctaw Culture Graces Every Page of Picture Book About an Artist in the Making

Stepping Stones: A Refugee Family’s Journey

  This unique picture book was inspired by the stone artwork of Syrian artist Nizar Ali Badr, discovered by chance by Canadian children’s writer Margriet Ruurs. The author was immediately impressed by the strong narrative quality of Mr. Badr’s work, and, using many of Mr. Badr’s already-created pieces, she set out to create a story … Continue reading Stepping Stones: A Refugee Family’s Journey

A Warwick Prize Shortlist and Clementine Loves Red

When a translated book for children makes the shortlist of an award also open to grown-up books, my heart leaps. Because yes, children’s literature is literature. And translators of children’s books need plenty of credit and support for their careers, made tenuous by the (currently—we can change this) low demand for #worldkidlit translated into English. … Continue reading A Warwick Prize Shortlist and Clementine Loves Red

Children’s Title Pick: Goodnight Mr. Clutterbuck by Mauri Kunnas

From the award-winning Mauri Kunnas, one of Finland’s most celebrated children’s writers and illustrators, a hilarious picture book full of animals, humor, and colorful pictures. Mr. Clutterbuck is blissfully unaware of his reputation as the busiest and loudest sleepwalker in town. Meek and mild-mannered when awake, at night Mr. Clutterbuck seeks thrills and adventures. Often … Continue reading Children’s Title Pick: Goodnight Mr. Clutterbuck by Mauri Kunnas