Articles

Translations in the British Library – by Frances Wood

Frances Wood is the author of several books, including most recently Betrayed Ally: China in the Great War (2016) and her new book Great Books of China: From Ancient Times to the Present (2017). Now retired, she was, for over thirty years, one of the key librarians and curators of the Chinese section of the British Library. … Continue reading Translations in the British Library – by Frances Wood

Jia Pingwa as Global Literature – by Nick Stember

Nick Stember is a historian and translator of Chinese comics and science fiction. In 2015 he completed a Master of Arts in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia. His work has been featured in The International Journal of Comic Art, Clarkesworld Magazine, LEAP: The International Art Magazine of Contemporary China, … Continue reading Jia Pingwa as Global Literature – by Nick Stember

Creating a dynamic new centre for Chinese literature in translation – by Frances Weightman

In the UK, most literary and translation events take place in London. A few years ago, Frances Weightman and Sarah Dodd, at the University of Leeds, set out to establish Leeds as the centre for new Chinese writing in "the North". Leeds is a city about halfway between London and Scotland (the train from London takes … Continue reading Creating a dynamic new centre for Chinese literature in translation – by Frances Weightman

Chinese Literature Prizes – by Chen Dongmei

China's domestic literary prizes are often viewed with uncertainty from abroad: Who runs them? Are they trustworthy? How are the different prizes specialized? Which should we be paying attention to? We asked Chen Dongmei, who usually exerts her influence behind the scenes at Paper Republic, to step forward and give us a rundown of prizes … Continue reading Chinese Literature Prizes – by Chen Dongmei

Ethnic-themed Literature out of China – by Bruce Humes

The People's Republic of China has a population of over 1.38 billion. About 90% of the population is ethnically Han-Chinese, which means that about 10% of the population belong to ethnic minorities. That's over 138 million people! We invited Bruce Humes to tell us more about these people and their literature. This post is in two … Continue reading Ethnic-themed Literature out of China – by Bruce Humes

Reincarnations: Chinese novels translated into English and into film – by Nicky Harman

This piece is by Nicky Harman of Paper Republic: Many libraries stock both books and films – a good film can encourage people to read the book, and vice versa, and it can be very interesting to compare a book with its film, to identify the changes and to understand the reasons behind them. For … Continue reading Reincarnations: Chinese novels translated into English and into film – by Nicky Harman

A mesmerised youth in the grip of the evolving capital: Feng Tang’s novel Beijing, Beijing – by Martina Codeluppi

Think about Beijing - what’s the first thought that comes to mind? Whether it’s politics, history, business, people, culture, smog, Olympics, Tian’anmen Square, university, food – our associations and experiences of a place are often associated with particular people at a particular time. The Chinese equivalent of Zeitgeist is shidai jingshen (literally, spirit of the age). And, … Continue reading A mesmerised youth in the grip of the evolving capital: Feng Tang’s novel Beijing, Beijing – by Martina Codeluppi

The Untouched Crime by Zijin Chen – by Michelle Deeter

Chen Zijin’s novel The Untouched Crime, translated by Michelle Deeter, was published last year by AmazonCrossing. You can find readers’ comments on the amazon website, and if you scroll down the amazon.co.uk page, you can see that AmazonCrossing made this book available to reviewers on Netgalley. But who better to tell us about the book than … Continue reading The Untouched Crime by Zijin Chen – by Michelle Deeter

Chinese Literature and the Law – by Emily Jones

The first translations of Sherlock Holmes into Chinese were published with spoiler titles like The Case of Sapphire in the Belly of the Goose, and The Case of the Jealous Woman Murdering Her Husband. Why give the game away so soon? To a large extent, it’s linked to Chinese gong’an [court case] fiction and the famous … Continue reading Chinese Literature and the Law – by Emily Jones

In China, writing reality as fiction – by Li Jingrui

A few years ago, Li Jingrui switched careers – she quit her job as a journalist (she reported on legal cases, and had a column in the Chinese edition of The Wall Street Journal) and turned to writing fiction. We selected her short story "Missing" for the Read Paper Republic series, and also featured it in … Continue reading In China, writing reality as fiction – by Li Jingrui