Articles

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Can You Hear the Trees Talking?: Discovering the Hidden Life of the Forest

Can You Hear the Trees Talking?: Discovering the Hidden Life of the Forest is a fascinating, informative, nonfiction book about the wonderful ecology of forests. Written by forester and global advocate Peter Wohlleben, it’s full of appealing color illustrations, quizzes, sidebars, and activities. All laid out in two-page spreads perfectly geared to readers age 8-12, … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Can You Hear the Trees Talking?: Discovering the Hidden Life of the Forest

South Asian Literature in Translation: An Introduction

December 2020 at the Global Literature in Libraries Initiative is ‘South Asian Literature in Translation’ month. As the host of the Desi Books podcast, I was thrilled to be asked to share South Asian books in English translation for the entire month. What a feast to assemble and present to readers around the world. And what a joy to share these personal, enriching pleasures with all of you. I’m thankful to Karen Van Drie for this opportunity and trust. And I’m grateful to all the South Asian translators who have contributed their works and thoughts that will be shared throughout the month here.

Literature of Exile: Saying Farewell

I can't believe how quickly this month has passed! When I took on my guest editorship, I worried that I wouldn't find enough books and authors to promote, and I'm ending this month longing to promote dozens more. Thanks to all my readers for your comments and your enthusiasm. It is gratifying to know that … Continue reading Literature of Exile: Saying Farewell

Literature of Exile: Palestine

Like the Kurds, to be a Palestinian is to grow up in exile, and with exile as a family heritage. During the Nakba, the catastrophe of 1948, "more than half of Palestine's native population, close to 800,000 people had been uprooted, 531 villages had been destroyed, and eleven urban neighborhoods emptied of their inhabitants (from … Continue reading Literature of Exile: Palestine

Literature of Exile: LGBTQ authors

The life of an exile is always complicated, but being an LGBTQ+ refugee can sometimes mean exile from your family and community as well as from your homeland. Today we look at writers from Iran, Somalia, and Pakistan who have confronted the challenge of being a gay refugee. Négar Djavadi flatly states, "I’m not an … Continue reading Literature of Exile: LGBTQ authors

Literature of exile: The refugee activist poet J. J. Bola

We came here to find refuge / They called us refugees / So we hid ourselves in their language / until we sounded just like them. / Changed the way we dressed / to look just like them / Made this our home / until we lived just like them. -- from J.J.Bola's poem "Refuge" … Continue reading Literature of exile: The refugee activist poet J. J. Bola

Hope and Hardship: The Picture Book As Exile Narrative

Today I am ceding editing rights to my friend and colleague Betsy Bird, an award winning children's author and librarian... Children’s books are written years in advance of their publication dates. A book being written at this very moment may take anywhere between two to five years to reach library and bookstore shelves. As such, … Continue reading Hope and Hardship: The Picture Book As Exile Narrative

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: A Winter’s Promise/ The Missing of Clairdelune

Set in a post-Rupture steampunk world, A Winter’s Promise and The Missing of Clairdelune by Christelle Dabos tell the story of Ophelia, a member of the Anima ark who can animate objects. Unassuming, clumsy, and shy, Ophelia has two major talents and life passions. First, she is a superb object “reader,” i.e., she can view … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: A Winter’s Promise/ The Missing of Clairdelune