#INTLYALITMONTH: The Gilded Ones by Namina Forna

Review by Sarah Ducharme The Gilded Ones by Namina Forna Deka is terrified. She is turning 16 and the Ritual of Purity is looming. She's worried that her community will discover what she has suspected about herself for years: she's different. She might even be "Impure," the label given to any girl whose blood runs … Continue reading #INTLYALITMONTH: The Gilded Ones by Namina Forna

#INTLYALITMONTH: Malika, Warrior Queen by Roye Okupe

Review by: James Toney Malika Warrior Queen: Volume 1 by Roye Okupe ISBN: 9781506723082 Publisher: Dark Horse Comics Illustrators: Chima Kalu and Raphael Kazeem Malika: Warrior Queen Volume 1 sets up an interesting story. At first, it seemed like the typical story about monarchies: fights over the throne, betrayal, birthrights, etc. but by the end, … Continue reading #INTLYALITMONTH: Malika, Warrior Queen by Roye Okupe

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Hunt is On (Seekers of the Aweto Book 1)

As an early literacy advocate, I am a huge proponent of graphic novels and comic books. Graphic novels can help hook reluctant readers, build visual literacy, and challenge students to read analytically. Do not let the presence of pictures fool you; as in picture books, there is often more to them that meets the eye. … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Hunt is On (Seekers of the Aweto Book 1)

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Mister Fairy

Think every fairy looks like Tinkerbell, with a cute tutu, and a twinkle in her lovely eye as she daintily darts around waving her magic wand like a ray of magical sunshine? Think again. "Everyone knows the forest is full of all kinds of fairies… There are morning fairies, brave fairies, sleepy-time fairies, and even … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Mister Fairy

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Sato the Rabbit

A surreal symphony of vibrant colors and images, Sato the Rabbit* is a whimsical trilogy of picture books for readers age 4-8: One day, Haneru Sato became a rabbit. He's been a rabbit ever since. He likes stars, the ocean, and tasty treats. He likes lots of other things, too. What young child hasn’t imagined … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Sato the Rabbit

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Magic Candies

I don't mean to brag, but my colleagues recognize me as a children's book maven. I often seem to know of the newest and most notable picture books, and get my hands on them as soon as they are available. How do I do it? In addition to reading a few trade publications and blogs, … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Magic Candies

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Fighting the Good Fight: Social Justice in Children’s (Translated) Books and Graphic Novels

Books for young readers help shape children’s minds, attitudes, and viewpoints. Hence it’s crucial for young readers to have the opportunity to hear diverse voices from around the world. Today’s impressionable, thoughtful young minds need to be aware of important issues and acts of historical or social justice. Graphic Novels Maus: A Survivor’s Tale From … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Fighting the Good Fight: Social Justice in Children’s (Translated) Books and Graphic Novels

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Children of the Forest

According to my research, if you were a child growing up in 20th century Sweden, you are very familiar with Elsa Beskow's Children of the Forest. Originally published as Tomtebobarnen in 1910, this sweet picture book has been enchanting children for over 100 years. Currently in its eighteenth (!) English language printing by Scotland-based publisher … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Children of the Forest

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Forgotten Book

Books can transport us across time and space, even though the journey is only an imaginary one. The literary voyages readers take within the pages of a book can inspire us and affect how we see the world via the magic of the written word. Writers, indeed, have immense power. But what if that literary … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Forgotten Book

#DutchKidLit – The Female Gothic and Lampie and the Children of the Sea by Annet Schaap

Like all good fairytales, Lampie and the Children of the Sea starts with things going horribly wrong for a young, vulnerable heroine. Lampie's name is a nickname that reflects her purpose, as she is in charge of lighting the lamp every night at the lighthouse where she lives with her drunken, lame father. She is … Continue reading #DutchKidLit – The Female Gothic and Lampie and the Children of the Sea by Annet Schaap