(More) ASIAN TITLES CELEBRATING UN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS & SOCIAL EMOTIONAL LEARNING

Consider this part two of the June 21st post where I highlighted mainly books from Singapore on the newly released booklist from the AFCC (Asian Festival of Children's Content) and the Singapore Book Council highlighting Asian titles celebrating UN SDG goals & social emotional learning. Now let's look at some books on the list from … Continue reading (More) ASIAN TITLES CELEBRATING UN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS & SOCIAL EMOTIONAL LEARNING

#INTLYALITMONTH: How Do You Live by Genzaburo Yoshina, Translated by Bruno Navasky

Review by Jeremy Willette How Do You Live? by Genzaburo Yoshina One part science lesson, two parts history, with a ton of philosophy and a splash of economics thrown in, this realistic fiction novel is sure to be a big hit with students who are curious about the world around them and their place in … Continue reading #INTLYALITMONTH: How Do You Live by Genzaburo Yoshina, Translated by Bruno Navasky

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Easy Life in Kamusari

Imagine leaving high school in a bustling metropolis and being sent deep into the mountains as a trainee forester. And—horror of horrors—having your mobile phone disabled on the day you arrive. This is what happens to Yuki Hirano, an eighteen-year-old Japanese boy, who freely admits that study is not his thing. Well, life in the … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: The Easy Life in Kamusari

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Colorful

As my dead soul leisurely drifted off to some dark place, this angel I’d never seen before suddenly appeared right in my way. "Congratulations! You’ve won the lottery!" The angel smiled. So begins Colorful, a surprisingly humorous YA novel about mental illness, bullying, and teen suicide. The protagonist—nameless throughout most of the book—isn’t thrilled to … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Colorful

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Fighting the Good Fight: Social Justice in Children’s (Translated) Books and Graphic Novels

Books for young readers help shape children’s minds, attitudes, and viewpoints. Hence it’s crucial for young readers to have the opportunity to hear diverse voices from around the world. Today’s impressionable, thoughtful young minds need to be aware of important issues and acts of historical or social justice. Graphic Novels Maus: A Survivor’s Tale From … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Fighting the Good Fight: Social Justice in Children’s (Translated) Books and Graphic Novels

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: The 2021 Eisner Award Nominations

Known as the Oscars of the comics world, the Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards are traditionally given every summer at San Diego Comic Con. Due to COVID-19, the ceremony was virtual in 2021, when the awards featured 33 categories. Books for children in translation can be found in a number of them. The pickings were … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: The 2021 Eisner Award Nominations

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Soul Lanterns

August 6, 1945, is a date forever etched into the memories of those who live in Hiroshima. Today, it is marked by the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Ceremony, where thousands of lanterns are set afloat along the Motoyasu River in memory of those who died in the devastating bombing of the city. Soul Lanterns, a historical … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Soul Lanterns

Day 14: 🇯🇵Moshi Moshi

Moshi Moshi means hello in Japanese, can be used on the phone and in other contexts. Observations: In November 2017, we went on our honeymoon to Japan. Prior to flying there, I ordered a few books by a smattering of Japanese authors. Kitchen was one of them. Kitchen is probably Yoshimoto’s most famous work, however … Continue reading Day 14: 🇯🇵Moshi Moshi

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Temple Alley Summer

Written by award-winning Japanese author Sachiko Kashiwaba, Temple Alley Summer* features not one but two ghost stories. The first is the outer shell in this engrossing middle-grade novel and a fully-fleshed narrative; the other is an embedded fairy-tale fantasy with intriguing connections and parallels to the first. In the “outer” ghost story, Kazu, who is … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Temple Alley Summer

The Booktrekker: Japan

READ One thing I’m enjoying about this reading-the-world project is that it’s nudging me to read international authors I’ve always heard about, but have never read. In the case of Japan, I finally read a book by bestselling author Haruki Murakami – Norwegian Wood, translated by Jay Rubin. As the novel opens, 37-year-old Toru Watanabe is … Continue reading The Booktrekker: Japan