Sharing the Magic: Translating Kadono Eiko, by Lynne E. Riggs

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 26 Editor's note:  Kadono Eiko is the recipient of the 2018 Hans Christian Andersen Award, the most prestigious prize given in children's literature worldwide.  She is best known outside of Japan for Majo no Takkyubin, ("Kiki's Delivery Service"), which was made into a popular animated movie by … Continue reading Sharing the Magic: Translating Kadono Eiko, by Lynne E. Riggs

Stories for Peace — Sako Ikegami on War in Japanese Children’s Literature

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 25 In any form of conflict, be it a global war or family strife, children are the most deeply impacted. Literature reflects this, and Japan, so profoundly transformed by its role in global war, is certainly no exception. Many Japanese children’s creators today experienced war first-hand as … Continue reading Stories for Peace — Sako Ikegami on War in Japanese Children’s Literature

Q&A with Translator Cathy Hirano on “The Beast Player,” by Hans Christian Andersen Award Winner Nahoko Uehashi

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 23 Editor's Note:  Yesterday, we quoted Kirkus' YA Editor Laura Simeon saying that the first piece of translated young adult fiction she had read was Kazumi Yumoto's The Friends (winner of the 1997 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for Fiction and the 1997 Batchelder Award).  Today we hear … Continue reading Q&A with Translator Cathy Hirano on “The Beast Player,” by Hans Christian Andersen Award Winner Nahoko Uehashi

Examining cultural messages in Japanese picture books — by Kirkus YA Editor Laura Simeon

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 22 Editor's Note:  Soon after Laura Simeon became Kirkus' YA Editor in January, she penned the following appeal for more translated literature: I clearly remember the first YA book in translation I ever read: Kazumi Yumoto’s 2002 title The Letters, translated from the Japanese by Cathy Hirano. … Continue reading Examining cultural messages in Japanese picture books — by Kirkus YA Editor Laura Simeon

Translator Showdown: Where Manga Meets the Novel — by publisher Bruce Rutledge

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 21  Two of Japan’s all-time best-selling writers, the late Shigeru Mizuki of Gegege no Kitaro fame and contemporary writer Haruki Murakami, have translators who live about seven miles apart from each other in the Seattle area. My company, Chin Music Press, decided to get those translators together … Continue reading Translator Showdown: Where Manga Meets the Novel — by publisher Bruce Rutledge

Sinking into a Classical Sunset — by Translator Jay Rubin

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 19   June 28, 2018 is the official UK publication date for my Penguin Book of Japanese Short Stories, which will contain thirty-one complete stories, one segment from an episodic story, one novella, and two excerpts from novels. Assembling the pieces, which range in publication date from … Continue reading Sinking into a Classical Sunset — by Translator Jay Rubin

Selected Japanese Picture Books — by Andrew Wong

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 18 Picture books anyone? I confess, I don’t remember reading many picture books in my childhood. I recall keeping a prized collection of The Adventures of Tintin and The Adventures of Asterix (eventually given away), but not many other kinds of stories told in pictures. Having missed out of … Continue reading Selected Japanese Picture Books — by Andrew Wong

The Four Immigrants Manga — Frederik L. Schodt

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 15 Editor's note:  Fred Schodt is best known for his work popularizing manga and anime outside of Japan.  But he has also spent much of his career shedding light on little known aspects of Japanese popular culture and history:  for instance, the story of Native American adventurer Ranald … Continue reading The Four Immigrants Manga — Frederik L. Schodt

The Compassionate Imagination – Sally Ito on Translating Misuzu Kaneko

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 14 Editor's note:  When I approached Canadian poet/translator Sally Ito about acting as translator for Are You an Echo? The Lost Poetry of Misuzu Kaneko, she and her aunt Michiko Tsuboi, her co-translator, had already translated at least a dozen of Misuzu's poems on their own.  The … Continue reading The Compassionate Imagination – Sally Ito on Translating Misuzu Kaneko

Anglophoned Fiction Favorites — by Smithsonian BookDragon Terry Hong, part 2

May GLLI Blog Series:  Japan in Translation, No. 13 Editor's note:  Today begins the second installment of Smithsonian BookDragon Terry Hong's current favorites in Japanese translated fiction.  It's interesting though perhaps coincidental to note that five of Terry's nine recommendations were written by women, and seven of the nine were translated by women.  I point … Continue reading Anglophoned Fiction Favorites — by Smithsonian BookDragon Terry Hong, part 2