Pakistani Author Bilal Tanweer on His Recent Translation of the Classic LOVE IN CHAKIWARA

Originally published on Bookwitty Muhammad Khalid Akhtar (1920–2002), modern Urdu literature's great master, worked as an electrical engineer in Karachi and began writing while still in service. He was a prolific writer whose oeuvre consisted of novels, short stories, essays, reviews, parodies and travelogues. His short story Khoya hua ufaq (written in 1943) was published … Continue reading Pakistani Author Bilal Tanweer on His Recent Translation of the Classic LOVE IN CHAKIWARA

Pakistani Author Maha Khan Phillips on her New Novel, The Curse of the Mohenjodaro

Originally published on Bookwitty Maha Khan Phillips is the author of Beautiful from this Angle and The Mystery of the Aagnee Ruby. She is a financial journalist and the editor of Professional Investor Magazine in the UK, where she lives part of the year, the rest of the time she spends in Karachi. Her novels … Continue reading Pakistani Author Maha Khan Phillips on her New Novel, The Curse of the Mohenjodaro

Title Pick: This Wide Night by Sarvat Hasin

"‘I could not turn back time, I could not give life. All I wanted was to learn what had happened to the Malik sisters.’ The Maliks live a life of relative freedom in 1970s Karachi: four beautiful sisters, Maria, Ayesha, Leila and Beena, are warily watched over by an unconventional mother. Captain Malik is usually … Continue reading Title Pick: This Wide Night by Sarvat Hasin

Daastan: Redefining the Foundations of Pakistan’s Publishing Industry

Pakistan’s publishing industry is operating offline. Editors, book agents and publishing houses are few in number, making it difficult for young people to get their work across to a large audience. According to the ISBN International, there are only 2,277 registered publishers all over Pakistan whereas in the USA alone, there are more than 400,000 … Continue reading Daastan: Redefining the Foundations of Pakistan’s Publishing Industry

Excerpt: Between Clay and Dust by Musharraf Ali Farooqi

Inner City The ruination of the inner city was attributed to time’s proclivity for change. It lay abandoned, half buried in and half surrounded by the squalor of shanty towns. New settlements cordoning it on three sides seemed to avoid the shadow of its sunken grandeur. Streets connecting new colonies skirted off its periphery. Links … Continue reading Excerpt: Between Clay and Dust by Musharraf Ali Farooqi