Eleanor and Abel by Annette Sanford

The Older Women in Fiction around the world begins with fiction from North America. This is a choice from a writer friend of mine. Like many writers she is a reader and her choice continues the theme of older women who thwart expectations. Another former schoolteacher, like Olive Kitteridge, Eleanor Bannister might be expected to have an unadventurous retirement. Indeed she appears to expect it of herself. But that would be to under-estimate this older woman as Annie reveals.

6 El & Abel

Eleanor and Abel

In this small town America older women are expected to work for the church, give charity lunches and continue to do their bit for the community. An uncompromising ex-school mistress Eleanor Bannister is aware that the eyes of the town are watching her as her relationship with Abel, an itinerant builder develops.  She is defiant, wary and to her chagrin vulnerable in this area of her life hitherto unexplored.

Eleanor’s routine is disrupted when the roof of the ‘honeymoon cottage’ left to her by her parents is damaged in a storm. The same storm blows Abel into town, looking for somewhere to rent. A competent builder he persuades her to let him repair the cottage.She is reluctant, she wants shot of the place, too many memories of her childhood, she still isn’t over the death of her parents some years before. Slowly she gives in and he becomes a regular feature in her life. The goal posts are moved bit by bit as she becomes used to his presence.

There is constant comment from her neighbour and life long friend Grace, who is jealous of the intruder but slowly gets to like the idea of a man in Eleanor’s life. Eleanor is in denial that she is romantically involved and repeatedly resorts to prayer and her diary as a means of dealing with this upset.

Abel has pretty quickly told Eleanor he is in love with her, the first time he sees her she is in her nightdress barefoot on the grass and that is when it happened. It’s not the Eleanor she feels herself to be and she is embarrassed but secretly excited by this.

Abel is polite but continues to woo her despite her determination to keep him at arms’ length. It’s a game of to and fro, each holding his or her ground as petty tiffs and reconciliation shape the development of their relationship.

At the point when Abel is really starting to get to her, Eleanor feels like shedding her old life. She sees her home as she now feels others see it, stuffy and old fashioned. On a whim she gets rid of all her clothes except of course her underwear and Grace is enlisted to help her buy a whole new wardrobe. Her clothes go to charity but she then sends Grace out to buy back her dressing gown, she can’t quite go through with it.

Abel’s past life emerges in the form of his daughter who much like him has drifted through her life. He had told Eleanor he could never be sure he wouldn’t blow out of town just as quickly as he had blown into it as he’s always had a restless spirit.

His daughter leaves her own child in their care as she sets off to look for her errant husband.

The honeymoon cottage is finished, but Abel then takes off to look for his daughter. Eleanor is now in a state of confusion having committed herself to a man who might at any time just disappear from her life.

Eleanor’s character

Eleanor resembles a woman from the pioneer era. Tough, independent, resilient, she built her life around these qualities, steering the town’s young population into adulthood with a stern resolve. She has never expected to be liked, she isn’t known for her sense of humour. Duty is important. Once one stage of life is finished another takes over and retirement means she can still have an important role in the community. She has little concern for the opinions of others or at least she likes to appear that way. Her weaknesses lie in the fact that she has clung onto the view of herself as a daughter to the parents with whom she lived. She seems unable to move on from this role and one wonders if the same doesn’t hold for her view of herself as a retired schoolmistress.

As the book evolves a very emotional Eleanor emerges. The desire to look after someone again takes over – she wants to iron Abel’s shirts as she’d done her father’s. It causes her all sorts of distress as it makes her vulnerable, something she dislikes. There is the fear of losing what she has so lately found. She finds she is more flexible than she thought; the prospects make her anxious, change is a challenge which she likes but find very scary.

Summary

The book was very easy reading. I was attracted to the character of Abel although I found him unbelievable. Eleanor’s character could at times be annoying, she is strong but rigid. I wished her to pack up her belongings and take off with Abel and perhaps this is what the writer intended. The limitations of small town life had been too thoroughly absorbed. The writer has captured the intimacy and involvement in its residents’ lives. The routine of everyday life and the challenge of sharing these with a hitherto stranger, whether to leave the door open when you’re in the bathroom, are those small but important details that face anyone regardless of age.

For older women readers who might like the idea of finding a relationship late in life this is a book to go for. The chances of finding a tall, slim, handsome at 75 drifter in your neighbourhood, who is fit, sexy, a sympathetic listener, saves his money, is incredibly practical and prepared to do his share of the cooking might be pretty unlikely but that’s what fiction is all about. A good holiday read.

Eleanor and Abel by Annette Sanford published in 2003 by Arrow Books. 188pp

Written by guest writer: Annie Morris.

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