Carolina Maria de Jesus: voice of the voiceless

By Sofia Perpétua The moment Carolina Maria de Jesus met Clarice Lispector, she couldn’t even look at her as she was so intimidated by her presence. She said: “My god, you’re a writer. Who am I next to you?” Clarice simply replied, “I might be a great writer but you’re the only one who tells … Continue reading Carolina Maria de Jesus: voice of the voiceless

Osman Lins, neat and amazing

By Hugo Almeida Osman Lins, one of the greatest Brazilian writers of the 20th century, has his three main books translated in the United States: Avalovara (University of Texas Press), translated by Gregory Rabassa; Nine, novena (Sun & Moon Press) and The Queen of the Prisons of Greece (Dalkey Archive Press), both translated by Adria … Continue reading Osman Lins, neat and amazing

Capitu, The Girl from Ipanema

Fundação Casa de Rui Barbosa

(Image: Fundação Casa de Rui Barbosa) BY ARY QUINTELLA Many years ago, on an autumn day, my sister was introduced to Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip. Titina — she's always been known by her nickname — had just turned eighteen. The Prince is renowned for his infelicitous remarks. For some reason, my parents' divorce, … Continue reading Capitu, The Girl from Ipanema

Lygia Fagundes Telles, Master of the Human and the Fantastic

By Dr. Lorena Sales dos Santos My first contact with the work of Lygia Fagundes Telles was during my early years of college, during a summer vacation. My mother,  who was an avid reader and had recently started to write some short stories, was reading Telles’s book Antes do Baile Verde (Before the Green Ball … Continue reading Lygia Fagundes Telles, Master of the Human and the Fantastic

Érico Veríssimo, the writer from the South of Brazil

By Dr. Cíntia Schwantes Érico Veríssimo was a Brazilian writer born in the extreme South of Brazil, in the city of Cruz Alta, on December 17, 1905. His father, the owner of the local drug shop, went bankrupt and he had to take care of his mother and younger siblings at an early age, following … Continue reading Érico Veríssimo, the writer from the South of Brazil

Japan’s “The Beast Player” and Finland’s “Maresi Red Mantle” Win 2020 GLLI Translated YA Book Prize

Winners Feature Striking Young Women Protagonists from Across the Globe The Beast Player, by Japan’s Nahoko Uehashi (translated from the Japanese by Cathy Hirano; Henry Holt & Co.) and Maresi Red Mantle, by Finland’s Maria Turtschaninoff (translated from the Swedish by A. A. Prime; Pushkin Press/Abrams Books) are co-winners of the 2020 GLLI Translated YA … Continue reading Japan’s “The Beast Player” and Finland’s “Maresi Red Mantle” Win 2020 GLLI Translated YA Book Prize

Brazil’s Biblioteca Nacional and Translation Support Program

In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of translations from world literatures into English. This increase is, without a doubt, a result of the global interest in translated fiction. But in the case of Brazil, there is also another stimulus for the publishers around the world: Biblioteca Nacional’s Translation Support Program. … Continue reading Brazil’s Biblioteca Nacional and Translation Support Program

Welcome to the Brazilian Literature Month

April 2020 is the Brazilian literature month in Global Literature in Libraries Initiative. When things are falling apart in the world, we still believe in the power of literature to bond us together and provide a safe haven mentally. Throughout this month, I will present translated and untranslated works from Brazilian literature and try to … Continue reading Welcome to the Brazilian Literature Month

Goodnight kiwi – haere rā

The kiwi is a remarkable bird. As Te Ara Encyclopedia explains, "The flightless, nocturnal kiwi is an oddity, and perhaps an unlikely choice for a national symbol. But the round body, long beak and short legs invite curiosity and affection – and it’s an easy bird to draw. It appears everywhere, on coins, stamps, shoe … Continue reading Goodnight kiwi – haere rā

Awards – recognition and publicity

New Zealand has a number of Book Awards run by different organizations. It is a great way for me as an ex-pat to keep up to date with the best of New Zealand writing. Awards can be arbitrary and follow the whimsy of the awards panel but overall what they offer all of us is … Continue reading Awards – recognition and publicity