#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Dragonfly Eyes

Oxymoronic as it may sound, there is an exciting comfort in picking up a book by a beloved author—or, as in Dragonfly Eyes, a beloved, award-winning writer-translator team. What joys, worlds, and experiences lurk within its pages? Will anticipation be tempered by disappointment? In the case of Dragonfly Eyes, Cao Wenxuan’s new YA historical novel, … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Dragonfly Eyes

#BlackIsBeautiful: Lets Celebrate the Beauty of Blackness with the Black Caucus of the American Library Association

Have you heard of the Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA)? This 50 year old organization is the oldest ethnic affiliate of the American Library Association (ALA). Established in 1970, BCALA, was formed to serve as an advocate for the development, promotion, and improvement of library services and resources to the nation’s African … Continue reading #BlackIsBeautiful: Lets Celebrate the Beauty of Blackness with the Black Caucus of the American Library Association

South African Writing – Day 20: An interview with two South African librarians

South African public libraries are a vital resource for South Africa's readers. They are incredible spaces of creation and learning and connection. I interviewed two local librarians to find out more about their work. Elzana Dlomo Elzana Dlomo is the senior librarian at Central Library in Cape Town. Central Library is located in the CBD … Continue reading South African Writing – Day 20: An interview with two South African librarians

South African Womxn Writers – Day 20: The Playwrights

Since I'm by no means an expert in plays or playwrights, I reached out to some writer friends for tips on SA womxn playwrights to look out for. Here are a few suggestions. Koleka Putuma - No Easter Sunday for Queers NO EASTER SUNDAY FOR QUEERS follows the hate crime murderlove story of Napo and Mimi. The lovers, … Continue reading South African Womxn Writers – Day 20: The Playwrights

#WorldKidLit Wednesday: Stars and Poppy Seeds

When I was a kid, I loved to count all sorts of things, as so many children do. Because numbers are fascinating! Even the names are cool: long before there was Google, there were googols and googolplexes. In Stars and Poppy Seeds, a picture book for ages 3-7, Flora is the child of mathematicians. And … Continue reading #WorldKidLit Wednesday: Stars and Poppy Seeds

South African Womxn Writing – Day 19: 245 South African Womxn’s novels you should read now (2015 – 2019)

In early 2020 I started making a list of all the fiction novels written South African women writers published between 1994 and 2019. I wrote more about this project, here. When I began I thought it would be labour intensive, but not overly complicated. I was right in one respect. Making a list of the … Continue reading South African Womxn Writing – Day 19: 245 South African Womxn’s novels you should read now (2015 – 2019)

South African Writing – Day 18: The literary festivals and podcasts

South Africa is home to some fantastic literary festivals every year, and to some podcasts that you might like to listen to from afar. The literary festivals took a knock in 2020, but many of them will (fingers crossed) be back in action this year. I thought I'd share some of these so you could … Continue reading South African Writing – Day 18: The literary festivals and podcasts

South African Womxn Writers – Day 17: An interview with non-fiction publisher, Na’eemah Masoet

For Feminism Is and Living While Feminist I had the ABSOLUTE pleasure of working with Na'eemah Masoet, non-fiction publisher at Kwela Books. I am a massive fan of Na'eemah's energy, approach, and books. So, I thought I'd give myself some extra time with her by doing a little Q&A. Enjoy! Why did you get into … Continue reading South African Womxn Writers – Day 17: An interview with non-fiction publisher, Na’eemah Masoet

South African Womxn Writers – Day 16: Coloured literature and the chance to be remembered – Terry-Ann Adams

I remember the day I read a poem written by a Coloured woman in Kaaps. That day was the start of my process of becoming. I felt like I had just been reborn into a world where it is okay for me to be seen. Before that day, I didn’t think that my culture or … Continue reading South African Womxn Writers – Day 16: Coloured literature and the chance to be remembered – Terry-Ann Adams