Memories of a GLLI Intern: Must-Read Children’s & YA Books from the Middle East and North Africa (Part 3) – by Nneka Mogbo

For children’s translated literature, I attempted targeting Arabic as an original language, which significantly limited the pool of children’s writers. This was disheartening for me. In my previous post, I discussed the Royal Diaries series, a historic fiction depiction of diaries from the point of views of real-life princesses. My love for Princess Nzingha of … Continue reading Memories of a GLLI Intern: Must-Read Children’s & YA Books from the Middle East and North Africa (Part 3) – by Nneka Mogbo

Memories of a GLLI Intern: Must-Read Adult Literature from the Middle East and North Africa (Part 2) – by Nneka Mogbo

The works I chose for my adult and college-aged list tell stories of conflicts (both good, bad and internal or external) that stem from interacting with different cultures. An interaction may be caused by one’s exile from a home country, moving to a new country for better opportunities, changes in generational beliefs or living in … Continue reading Memories of a GLLI Intern: Must-Read Adult Literature from the Middle East and North Africa (Part 2) – by Nneka Mogbo

Memories of a GLLI Intern: Culture Meet Identity or Identity Meet Culture? (Part 1) – by Nneka Mogbo

Every day I take note of the way I interact with world. I attend a private college in the American south just two hundred miles from where I grew up. I grew up in a suburban town outside Metro Atlanta. My family was one of the few black families in our neighborhood. My parents are … Continue reading Memories of a GLLI Intern: Culture Meet Identity or Identity Meet Culture? (Part 1) – by Nneka Mogbo

Rwandan Genocide, The Task of Translation, and Western Markets for Testimony: Part II – by Kim Rostan

Whoever writes is exiled from writing, which is the country—his own—where he is not a prophet. Maurice Blanchot,  The Writing of the Disaster   This summer, while collaborating with Rachel Hildebrandt of GLLI and a group of undergraduates at Wofford College, in the midst of collating lists of contemporary literature in translation, I pondered the … Continue reading Rwandan Genocide, The Task of Translation, and Western Markets for Testimony: Part II – by Kim Rostan

Rwandan Genocide, The Task of Translation, and Western Markets for Testimony: Part I—by Kim Rostan

Whoever writes is exiled from writing, which is the country—his own—where he is not a prophet. Maurice Blanchot,  The Writing of the Disaster   When the Rwandan genocide began in 1994, the “era of testimony” (as dubbed by scholar Shoshana Felman) was already well underway. Following the Nazi genocide in Europe, there was initially relative … Continue reading Rwandan Genocide, The Task of Translation, and Western Markets for Testimony: Part I—by Kim Rostan

Translators Association – 60 Years of Classic Translations: Season of Migration to the North (1969)

SEASON OF MIGRATION TO THE NORTH was selected by the Arab Literary Academy as the most important Arab novel of the 20th century, and is frequently cited as one of the most important post-colonial works in any language. Eminently readable, the metaphorical exploration of the relationship between colonial powers and their victims and the politics … Continue reading Translators Association – 60 Years of Classic Translations: Season of Migration to the North (1969)

The Particular Sadness of the Three Percent Problem: Part 3 – by Lydia Estes

Just as my Art History studies in college have allowed me to make sense of centuries of history through art, and this research with GLLI has emphasized how much I have learned about the world through the books I read.  As a teenager, I explored novels set in Mexico (Esperanza Rising) and short stories inspired … Continue reading The Particular Sadness of the Three Percent Problem: Part 3 – by Lydia Estes

THE PARTICULAR SADNESS OF THE THREE PERCENT PROBLEM: PART 2 – BY LYDIA ESTES

Acts of translation occur everywhere around us. My final essay for an AP Literature course in high school concerned a novel from the magical realism genre but with a twist; set in Los Angeles, The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake certainly is not a book in translation and is not your typical magical realism novel. … Continue reading THE PARTICULAR SADNESS OF THE THREE PERCENT PROBLEM: PART 2 – BY LYDIA ESTES

The Particular Sadness of the Three Percent Problem: Part 1 – by Lydia Estes

When I was in the second grade, the visits to the library were often the best part of any day.  To this day, bookstores are still a sacred space to me. A voracious reader with a fixation on spelling, it was a competition every week with my best friend to see who could learn all … Continue reading The Particular Sadness of the Three Percent Problem: Part 1 – by Lydia Estes

The World Lit Professor’s Conundrum: A Personal Reflection – By Kim Rostan

The relationship between an educator teaching world literature and translated works is an obvious one, but the connection between that teacher and a community of translators and publishers is not at all a given.  In fact, many of us who teach World Literature in colleges and universities are graduates of English literature programs, where, unlike … Continue reading The World Lit Professor’s Conundrum: A Personal Reflection – By Kim Rostan