Title Pick: I’m an Old Commie! by Dan Lungu (Romania)

Emilia, a pensioner in northern Romania, is forced to confront the nostalgic illusions she nurtures as a reaction to the grim post-communist present when her daughter, now living in Canada, telephones urging her not to vote for the former communists in upcoming elections. Determined to discover in her own mind why ‘things were better back … Continue reading Title Pick: I’m an Old Commie! by Dan Lungu (Romania)

Publisher Spotlight: Bookosmia

About Bookosmia (smell of books)- At Bookosmia (https://www.bookosmia.com ), our mission is to make children to fall in love with Books.Given the challenge from the ubiquitous screen, we try to make reading experiential through engaging add ons based on the book, live events like storytelling etc About our book " I Wish I Were" I am attaching … Continue reading Publisher Spotlight: Bookosmia

World KidLit Title Pick: Cici’s Journal (France) by Joris Chamblain and Aurelie Neyret

Cici dreams of being a novelist. Her favorite subject: people, especially adults. She’s been watching them and taking notes. Everybody has one special secret, Cici figures, and if you want to write about people, you need to understand what’s hiding inside them. But now she’s discovered something truly strange: an old man who disappears into … Continue reading World KidLit Title Pick: Cici’s Journal (France) by Joris Chamblain and Aurelie Neyret

Publishers Spotlight: Mkuki na Nyota Publishers – by Yeshira Roseborough

Through our work we aim to encourage and develop a culture of reading in Tanzania, as well as nurturing indigenous literature as a method of preserving and sharing stories.                                                                                                           -Mkuki na Nyota Publishers During my research I stumbled upon one of the most navigable publishing sites which showcased both the original and translated books. Mkuki … Continue reading Publishers Spotlight: Mkuki na Nyota Publishers – by Yeshira Roseborough

How We Read: Western Projections into the African Literature Space – by Yeshira Roseborough

As an English major, I have been able to get a glimpse at how African literature is perceived in American society. We regularly consume images of Africans that depict low access to education, poverty, war, and disease as the continent’s major characteristics. For me, this highly publicized, dehumanizing narrative of Africa reinforces the importance of … Continue reading How We Read: Western Projections into the African Literature Space – by Yeshira Roseborough

Memories of a GLLI Intern: Must-Read Children’s & YA Books from the Middle East and North Africa (Part 3) – by Nneka Mogbo

For children’s translated literature, I attempted targeting Arabic as an original language, which significantly limited the pool of children’s writers. This was disheartening for me. In my previous post, I discussed the Royal Diaries series, a historic fiction depiction of diaries from the point of views of real-life princesses. My love for Princess Nzingha of … Continue reading Memories of a GLLI Intern: Must-Read Children’s & YA Books from the Middle East and North Africa (Part 3) – by Nneka Mogbo

Memories of a GLLI Intern: Must-Read Adult Literature from the Middle East and North Africa (Part 2) – by Nneka Mogbo

The works I chose for my adult and college-aged list tell stories of conflicts (both good, bad and internal or external) that stem from interacting with different cultures. An interaction may be caused by one’s exile from a home country, moving to a new country for better opportunities, changes in generational beliefs or living in … Continue reading Memories of a GLLI Intern: Must-Read Adult Literature from the Middle East and North Africa (Part 2) – by Nneka Mogbo

Memories of a GLLI Intern: Culture Meet Identity or Identity Meet Culture? (Part 1) – by Nneka Mogbo

Every day I take note of the way I interact with world. I attend a private college in the American south just two hundred miles from where I grew up. I grew up in a suburban town outside Metro Atlanta. My family was one of the few black families in our neighborhood. My parents are … Continue reading Memories of a GLLI Intern: Culture Meet Identity or Identity Meet Culture? (Part 1) – by Nneka Mogbo

Rwandan Genocide, The Task of Translation, and Western Markets for Testimony: Part II – by Kim Rostan

Whoever writes is exiled from writing, which is the country—his own—where he is not a prophet. Maurice Blanchot,  The Writing of the Disaster   This summer, while collaborating with Rachel Hildebrandt of GLLI and a group of undergraduates at Wofford College, in the midst of collating lists of contemporary literature in translation, I pondered the … Continue reading Rwandan Genocide, The Task of Translation, and Western Markets for Testimony: Part II – by Kim Rostan

Rwandan Genocide, The Task of Translation, and Western Markets for Testimony: Part I—by Kim Rostan

Whoever writes is exiled from writing, which is the country—his own—where he is not a prophet. Maurice Blanchot,  The Writing of the Disaster   When the Rwandan genocide began in 1994, the “era of testimony” (as dubbed by scholar Shoshana Felman) was already well underway. Following the Nazi genocide in Europe, there was initially relative … Continue reading Rwandan Genocide, The Task of Translation, and Western Markets for Testimony: Part I—by Kim Rostan